EPICONDYLITIS/ELBOW TENDINOSIS


Due to repetitive stress across the common tendon of the wrist flexors (medial) or extensors (lateral) → collagen breakdown and a failure of tendon healing, resulting in a tendinosis. Not actually due to inflammation of the epicondyle as the classic name suggests.

Medial epicondylitis is known as golfer’s elbow.
LaTeral epicondylitis is commonly called Tennis elbow.

SYMPTOMS/EXAM

DIAGNOSIS

TREATMENT

A 45-year-old female with no significant past medical history presents to your office with 2 weeks of worsening pain in her right arm. For the past 2 months she has worked on a plastics manufacturing assembly line. A physical examination reveals no swelling and a normal range of motion. She has normal strength in the upper extremity but she experiences increased pain with extension of her right wrist against resistance. Palpation reveals marked tenderness over the lateral epicondyle of the right arm.
Which one of the following is most likely to improve the patient’s long-term outcome?

A) Physical therapy
B) Regular physical activity using her hands and arms
C) Use of an inelastic, nonarticular proximal forearm strap
D) Modifying her work routines